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Hear the FIRST ever documented sounds of a stingray

The short, loud clicking sounds made by a stingray as it swam across a reef off the coast of the Gill Islands in Indonesia are the earliest documentation of the sound-producing creature.

A team of Swedish and Australian researchers observed a mangrove whipray “talking” as it moved the breathing openings near its eyes, called spiracles, in a video.

The noise production of stingrays, and even sharks, is unknown, but watching the stingray walk away from the camera suggests the clicking could be a sign of distress or a defense mechanism

The team, however, isn’t completely sure how the stingray makes noise, but suggests it could be by contracting its spiracles and opening its gills simultaneously.

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The noise production of stingrays, and even sharks, is unknown, but a video suggests the noises have just been overlooked because the creatures make a loud clicking noise. Pictured is a snapshot of the ray that was captured in the video

“Whether sound production is achieved by rapid water expulsion or some other internal mechanism is plausible, but remains to be seen, and further research into the internal morphology of these rays is needed,” the study, published in the journal, states. Ecology magazine.

The path to this historic discovery began in 2018 when marine scientist Joni Pini-Fitzsimmons, who is leading the work, received a video of the mangrove.

Without thinking too much about it, they put it on the back burner for another time.

However, it wasn’t until they heard the same loud click from another mangrove in a clip shared on Instagram that the team decided to dig.

The team, however, isn't completely sure how the stingray makes noise, but suggests it could be by contracting its spiracles and opening its gills simultaneously.

The team, however, isn’t completely sure how the stingray makes noise, but suggests it could be by contracting its spiracles and opening its gills simultaneously.

Pini-Fitzsimmons and his colleagues sifted through troves of stingray data to find anything resembling the noises.

“To our knowledge, this is not something that has been recorded or released before,” Pini-Fitzsimmons said. “I don’t know exactly why that would be the case.”

Pini-Fitzsimmons theorizes that humans have heard the sound before while snorkeling, but due to the equipment making its own noises, the click was overlooked.

“Other similar species can also produce sounds, but anecdotal records may not have been discovered yet; our paper may therefore serve to shed light on other examples from the public and researchers,” the study read.

Stingrays are found all over the world and come in different sizes, including one caught in Cambodia which is said to be the largest freshwater fish in the world.

In June, a fisherman hooked a huge stingray that weighs 661 pounds and is 13 feet long, breaking the previous record for a catfish, discovered in Thailand in 2005, which weighed 646 pounds.

Stingrays are found all over the world and come in different sizes, including one caught in Cambodia which is said to be the largest freshwater fish in the world.  In June, a fisherman caught a huge stingray that weighs 661 pounds and is 13 feet long

Stingrays are found all over the world and come in different sizes, including one caught in Cambodia which is said to be the largest freshwater fish in the world. In June, a fisherman caught a huge stingray that weighs 661 pounds and is 13 feet long

The ray, nicknamed “Boramy” or “full moon” in the Khmer language, was caught in the Mekong River, which is famous for hosting various species of large fish.

A team of scientists from the Wonders of Mekong research project helped tag, measure and weigh the stingray before it was released back into the river.

The wonders of Mekong chief Zeb Hogan told AFP: “Big fish are in danger around the world. These are high value species. They take a long time to mature. So if they are caught before they mature, they have no chance of reproducing.

“A lot of these big fish are migratory, so they need large areas to survive. They are affected by things like habitat fragmentation caused by dams, obviously affected by overfishing.

“Thus, about 70% of the world’s giant freshwater fish are threatened with extinction, as well as all species in the Mekong.”